Infinite possibilities.

A look at the 2017 Adobe Mobile Maturity Survey.

Mobile is changing us.

When it comes to mobile, the possibilities are infinite. From earthquake warnings to epidemiology, social sciences, urban planning, and mental health, the data we can collect and the experiences we can now deliver and monitor on mobile phones are unlocking a new understanding of ourselves and the world around us that is limitless:
 
  • Researchers are exploring how mobile phone data may help determine whether someone is suffering from depression.1
  • Leading medical studies are now developing strategies for mining mobile data to support learning about the spread of diseases by monitoring attitudes and concerns about infectious diseases.2
  • Scientists have shown that mobile phone data can accurately predict what the phone’s owner will do tomorrow.3
 
We’re just beginning to unleash the vastness of the universe that mobile experiences are revealing, but for business, the implications are clear. In this new era of customer experience, the benefits are compelling for those who build foundations that can efficiently manage the mobile experience, ensure privacy, and offer an attractive value in exchange for access to data. In our 2017 Mobile Maturity Survey, we surveyed marketing and IT decision-makers to benchmark their core mobile marketing and development investments. In the study, we evaluate the progress toward mobile maturity and the mobile opportunity. This report is a sampling from the study and related data from Adobe. Mobile is changing us.
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The mobile opportunity.

 

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Customers are mobile, particularly on their smartphones. Adobe Digital Index, which aggregates consumers’ mobile behavior, found that 92 percent of respondents consider their smartphones to be their primary device.4 In fact, the average user checks their smartphone 85 times a day.5 Collectively, Americans check their phones 8 billion times a day.6

Consumers showing increasing preference for mobile devices across market segments.

Mobile Phone Traffic — Retail
49%
Mobile Phone Traffic — Travel
69%
Mobile Phone Traffic — Healthcare
72%
Mobile Phone Traffic — Automotive
38%
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Strategy as marketing shifts to mobile.

 

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The majority of leading marketers have had a well-defined mobile strategy for at least two years—and even longer for those in the media and entertainment industry. Marketing and IT leaders have started by implementing a mobile strategy as the driving force. About half of marketing decision-makers say their mobile strategy contributes to cross-channel, data-driven, and customer-experience efforts. Roughly a third say the strategy drives those efforts.

Mobile strategy’s significance to digital maturity.

Mobile’s Role in Cross-Channel Marketing
 
Mobile’s Role in Cross-Channel Marketing
Mobile’s Role in Data-Driven Marketing
 
Mobile’s Role in Data-Driven Marketing
Mobile’s Role in Customer Experience
 
Mobile’s Role in Customer Experience
Melissa Lemberg

“We’re in the midst of a journey right now in trying to figure out how to scale mobile from a tiger team approach…to finding ways to spread responsibility for mobile across, frankly, the whole company, down to store manager levels and people that work in store operations. Mobile’s not something that can be successful at The Home Depot with a small team of ninjas. We need to have the entire company behind the effort.”

Matt Jones,
General manager of mobile, Home Depot7

 

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Mobile experience creation.

 

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today your customers can take their pick from an increasingly limitless variety of experiences from physical to web, mobile web, and apps to augmented and virtual reality and a growing list of experiences with screens and things. If the decision is whether you should use mobile apps or the web to create your experiences, the answer is yes. Many companies are still trying to decide where to invest their time and resources—web or app. The answer is both.
 
As our survey shows, although 47 percent of marketing decision-makers today are prioritizing or shifting to apps, only 36 percent of IT decision-makers agree with that strategy.

Focus of mobile efforts.

Focus of mobile efforts
Some 38 percent of IT decision-makers are prioritizing or shifting to mobile web, but only 32 percent of marketing decision-makers agree with that strategy. Financial services decision-makers prioritize web and apps equally. Clearly both are important—and the top reasons for choosing either one include broader reach, customer preference, and for apps, because they’re the future. According to the Gartner report The Enterprise App Explosion: Scaling One to 100 Mobile Apps, "through 2017, the market demand for mobile app development services will grow at least five times faster than internal IT organizations' capacity to deliver them."8
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Mobile acquisition.

 

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mobile apps now take up almost 60 percent of total digital time spent.9 But even if your app is among the best, users won’t show up unless you have the right acquisition strategy in place. The average cost per acquisition continues to climb, with costs of US$2.57 for Android apps and US$3.99 for iOS apps reported in late 2015.10 But after 90 days, the retention rate drops to 4 percent.11
 
Marketing and IT decision-makers still consider paid media the most effective. Search and social are thought to be more effective than display ads and video for acquiring mobile app and website users. Only small minorities consider any of the paid media tested as ineffective.

Effectiveness of paid media.

In Acquiring Mobile App Users
 
In Acquiring Mobile App Users
In Acquiring Mobile Website Visitors
 
In Acquiring Mobile Website Visitors
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Mobile analytics.

 

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you want to create stellar experiences, you must understand the data underlying how your customers are using each experience and what makes them convert or come back. Four-fifths of IT decision-makers recognize the importance of analytics, and it’s gaining year over year among marketing decision-makers.

Technologies currently used for mobile apps.

Analytics
 
Analytics
Content Management
 
Content Management
Messaging
 
Messaging
Targeting
 
Targeting
Optimization
 
Optimization
Roughly 50 percent of marketers use each of the five technologies evaluated for mobile apps shown above, with analytics more common among IT decision-makers and both analytics and targeting use rising year over year among marketing decision-makers.
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Mobile engagement.

 

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marketers from leading companies drive app engagement in various ways. Roughly half use push messaging, relaunch campaigns via owned media, and relaunch campaigns via paid media tactics. IT decision-makers report a lower use of these tactics.

Tactics used to drive re-engagement.

Push messaging
 
Push messaging
Re-launch campaigns via owned media
 
Re-launch campaigns via owned media
Re-launch campaigns via paid media
 
Re-launch campaigns via paid media
Push notifications are the current darling—most marketers use them often. When powered by real-time analytics, they’re ideal for alerts, new offers, and content. But they must be orchestrated and automated along with other messaging channels. For example, you might send a push message to a user who does not open email.
 
In-app messaging is on the cusp of widespread adoption too. Again, with input based on analytics, in-app messaging can be used to cross-promote apps, content, and services and to request app store ratings.
 
The infinite possibilities presented by mobile are changing the world. They should be changing your business as well. For more insights on the 2017 Adobe Mobile Maturity Survey, download the full report, or visit mobile.adobe.com to see how Adobe can help.
 
Touching the infinite
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© 2017 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA. 3/17
  1. Aditya Tejas, “Mobile Phone Usage Patterns Can Predict Depression: Study,” International Business Times, July 16, 2015. http://www.ibtimes.com/mobile-phone-usage-patterns-can-predict-depression-study-2011314

  2. Amy Wesolowski, C. J. E. Metcalf, Nathan Eagle, et al., “Quantifying seasonal population fluxes driving rubella transmission dynamics using mobile phone data,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2015. http://www.pnas.org/content/112/35/11114

  3. Sara Malm and Lucy Osborne, “Mobile phone companies can predict futur movements of users by building a profile of their lifestyle,” Daily Mail.com, August 19, 2012 http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2190531/Mobile-phone-companies-predict-future-movements-users-building-profile-lifestyle.html

  4. “Mastering the complexity of mobile with simplicity: 2015 Adobe Mobile Consumer Report,” Adobe, November 2015 http://landing.adobe.com/en/na/solutions/experience-manager/188465-mobile-consumer-study.html

  5. Sally Andrews, David A. Ellis, Heather Shaw, Lukasz Piwek, “Beyond Self-Report: Tools to Compare Estimated and Real-World Smartphone Use,” PLOS One, October 28, 2015 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0139004

  6. Lisa Eadicicco, “Americans check their phones 8 billion times a day,” Time, December 15, 2015 http://time.com/4147614/smartphone-usage-us-2015/

  7. Matt Asay, “Taking the leap toward mobile-first marketing,” Adobe Digital Marketing Blog, June 14, 2016.“ https://www.comscore.com/Insights/Presentations-and-Whitepapers/2016/The-2016-US-Mobile-App-Report

  8. The Enterprise App Explosion: Scaling One to 100 Mobile Apps,” Gartner, May 7, 2015 https://www.gartner.com/doc/3047818/enterprise-app-explosion-scaling-mobile

  9. The 2016 U.S. Mobile App Report,” comScore, September 13, 2016. https://www.comscore.com/Insights/Presentations-and-Whitepapers/2016/The-2016-US-Mobile-App-Report

  10. Patrick Monk, “Which Mobile Marketing Metric Should Marketers Track?” Singular Blog, November 26, 2015. https://medium.com/@madmork/which-mobile-marketing-metric-should-marketers-track-4bfede3bd00a

  11. David Bolton, “The Average App Loses More Than 75% of Its Users After One Day,” Arc from Applause, May 20, 2016. https://arc.applause.com/2016/05/20/app-retention-rates-2016/