Pi Font Read Me

When Adobe® invented the Type 1 font format in 1984, fonts had a simple structure: They simply mapped the fonts' glyphs to keystrokes. Later TrueType introduced an intermediate step (now carried forward in OpenType®), associating character codes with the glyphs. The Operating System then associates keystrokes with the character codes using resources called keyboard layouts.

This keystroke-character-glyph model allows OpenType fonts to use standardized values for characters outside the basic Latin shown on most keyboards. This improves on the Type 1 fonts, which simply mapped characters like "checkbox", "cosine", or "star" to normal alphabetic values. With Type 1 symbol fonts people could use the keyboard to enter glyphs, but what got stored in the text of a document was gibberish. Or people could use the OpenType fonts and get correct character values stored in their document's text, but they couldn't use a keyboard to enter them. (There are no keys for "checkbox", "cosine", or "star" on a normal keyboard, to use the previous example.).

When we started shipping OpenType symbol fonts in 2002, Adobe included the original Type 1 versions with them. Providing both formats allowed people to choose between keyboard convenience and text accuracy. This was always meant to be a temporary measure; the full solution is to let people access symbol glyphs in OpenType fonts on their keyboards. Now that is finally possible, as we've provided keyboard layouts for these fonts. With these layouts installed, a user who wants to enter characters in a symbol font (for example, Carta®) from the keyboard simply selects the layout for that font (just like the keyboard layouts that came with the OS, like the U.S. standard, U.S. Dvorak, or French keyboard).

We've tried to preserve the configurations used in the original fonts, so people who were familiar with those will know what key each character uses. Other users will want to look at the layout diagrams before keyboarding a symbol font. Of course if you're using only one or two glyphs, it may still be simpler to use the Glyphs panel in your layout application, or an OS utility to select the glyphs you desire.


Installing keyboard layouts on Windows

Installing keyboard layouts on the Mac

Installing keyboard layouts on Windows

Note

Although referenced in the PDF keyboard map, several characters might not be accessible by keyboard on Windows. In such cases, resort to the Glyph Palette of the application, or to the system-wide Character Map.

Additional note for Windows XP users

For Windows XP, a system restart might be necessary after installing and uninstalling the keyboards.

In some cases, you will need to select another input language. To do so:

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Installing keyboard layouts on the Mac

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© 2011 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All Rights Reserved.

Adobe and Carta are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States and/or other countries. Mac, Macintosh and TrueType are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the United States and other countries. Windows and OpenType are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. Patent and Trademark Office and may be registered in certain other jurisdictions. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

Pi Font Read Me
October 2011